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post-irony

recently purged from, then reinstated to Wikipedia’s entry on irony:

Post irony

Post Irony is a technique that uses the juxtaposition of empty symbolism and loaded evocations to create humor whose roots lie not so much in the mocking of any one ideology proper so much as in mocking the stupidity that lies at the roots of the propagation of modern ideologies.

Post Irony exists in the aesthetic lineage of Dadaism and Surrealism. This is evidenced by the premium it places on non-sequiturs as well as its tendency to ignore the meaning of a loaded symbol (such as the Twin Towers falling, a cross, or even some Freudian and Jungian symbols) and to recontextualize such symbols in forums (children’s TV show parodies, marketing catchphrases, or pop song parodies) at odds with the gravity that has been ascribed to them. Post-Ironic works also tend to be more reliant on an internal, almost musical logic than on a causal, narrative one.

Not purged from the same:

Irony as infinite, absolute negativity

There is a tradition that sees irony not as a limited tool in the sense of the three types of irony above, but as a disruptive force with the power to undo texts and readers alike. This tradition includes Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard, 19th century German critic and novelist Friedrich Schlegel (“On Incomprehensibility”), Charles Baudelaire, Stendhal, and the 20th century deconstructionist Paul de Man (“The Concept of Irony”). Briefly, it insists that irony is, in Kierkegaard’s words, “infinite, absolute negativity”. Where much of philosophy attempts to reconcile opposites into a larger positive project, Kierkegaard and others insist that irony – whether expressed in complex games of authorship or simple litotes – must, in Kierkegaard’s words, “swallow its own stomach”. Irony entails endless reflection and violent reversals, and ensures incomprehensibility at the moment it compels speech.

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